Eco-concious ‘Puzzle Piece’ trivets

Eco-concious ‘Puzzle Piece’ trivets

Multicolored ecoconcious trivets and coasters in european wool felt offcuts

Puzzle-piece wool felt tableware

A few years ago the “Puzzle Pieces” were introduced after the pile of tea cosy offcuts next to the sewing machine became too high to ignore.  This fine quality, well-made 100% wool felt from Europe was just too dear to throw out — and the colourful scraps far too pretty to ignore.

Stack of colourful wool felt coasters, eco concious and stylish.

The excellent manufactured wool felt that Flock of Tea Cosy uses (both the locally made Industrial felt and the colourful European felt) is wonderfully consistent –  exactly 1/8″ thick, evenly dense, smooth, crisp and clean looking, and the rich jewel-tone colours are pretty and colour-fast, remaining bright for years.  The natural baaa-baaa colour of the industrial felt also holds its natural colour.

Industrial wool felt hotpad with orange zig-zag stitching.

Wool felt coasters, trivets, hotpads, table-toppers

I was particularly drawn to this wool felt’s density which makes it an excellent insulator — perfect for tea, coffee and mug cozies.  When noodling for ideas of what to make with the many small off-cuts it was primarily the insulating quality that inspired me.  The result is a bevy of coasters, trivets, hotpads and table toppers that protect surfaces from hot teapots, warm serving plates, and damp vases.

Eco-concious colourful wool felt trivet and coaster set made from offcuts.

Their making is akin to the quilts or rag-rugs our grand- and great grandmothers used to make using up otherwise useless scraps and small fabric pieces, although I take a much more free-form approach.  Their rugs and quilts embodied an ethos that is enduringly forward- thinking and contemporary which we now call “green thinking” or “eco-friendly.”

Carefully fitting the trivets, coasters, etc together is a wonderful piece of puzzling so they’ve been dubbed “the puzzle pieces.”

Elegant, handmade table-topper in European wool felt soft neutrals.

They take a silly amount of time to cut and sew together but I’m very pleased to not be wasting the fabric, and love the final pieces.  The felt has a wonderful hand-feel and weight, and the zig-zag stitching holding the pieces together both ensures durability and adds a graphic visual element that I like.  I find creating them it somewhat akin to drawing especially as each one is different, like a small piece of art.

‘Cruz Collection’ trivet & coaster sets

Some of the larger offcuts are cut and stitched with a simple cross pattern — dubbed the Cruz Collection and bundled into trivet and coaster sets.  They make a perfect complement to one of the tea cosies, or alone as a gift set — a hostess gift perhaps?

Upcycled wool felt offcuts in Moss Green trivet and coaster set.

Shop trivets and coasters

 

How to clean wool felt

How to clean wool felt

Tea is widely used as a dye and its stains can be, well, a bugger to get out of a nice white shirt for instance. Since cleaning and care is a common question about these wool felt tea cosies I thought I’d re-post some cleaning tests I did a few years ago.

One can always take it to a dry cleaner, but some simple, quick action is really the best and easiest way to keep your wool felt tea cosy looking fresh and new:

In the name of science herewith a test run of tea stains on some samples of the felt used to make the flock’s tea cosies and a step by step on cleaning.

Firstly, felt is created by washing and mashing and washing and mashing wool so that its fibres all wrap around each other and become the lovely dense mass that we know and love. So don’t pop the felt tea cosy into the wash — either hand or machine — because it will continue the felting process. (Hands up all of us who’ve shrunk that beautiful wool sweater by putting in the washing machine.)

1. WOOL FELT RESISTS LIQUID
The dense wool naturally resists liquid, in this case a teaspoon of fine high-grown ceylon tea.

Felt cleaning A

Note how the felt fabric naturally resists the liquid? Now’s the time to quickly blot it up.

2. BLOT THE LIQUID
Use a clean white paper towel or rag and gently blot the liquid. As the stain is absorbed into the paper towel, keep moving to a clean part of the towel so you’re not re-transferring the tea into the felt.

It all comes off with no staining evident.
Felt cleaning samples after blotting B

3. HEAVY TEA STAINING
With time and movement the tea will be absorbed by the felt fabric. So in the interest of science (and with some effort) some strong black tea was rubbed in to the wool felt samples. The Cornflower Blue sample was added for this test since it’s a paler colour.
Felt samples with heavy tea stains

4. SPOT CLEANED AND BLOTTED
The tea spots were lifted on the Tangerine and Burnt Orange by firmly blotting with tepid water using a clean white paper towel. No soap or dish detergent was used — just water.

As the stain is absorbed into the paper towel, keep moving to a clean part of the towel so you’re not re-transfering the tea into the felt. Once clean, the samples were blot-dried using another clean paper towel. I used paper towels because they were handy and white, but a well used clean rag — well used so that all sizing is out of it and it’s super-absorbent — works too, of course.

Felt samples after spot cleaning
As you can see, there are no spots visible on the Tangerine and Burnt Orange samples, but there are spots faintly visible on the Industrial felt (which is 80% wool) and the Cornflower Blue samples.

5. SPOT CLEANED WITH WATER, SALT AND PEROXIDE BLEACH
So I went to work on the Industrial and the Cornflower Blue samples.

The Industrial came clean with just a bit more blotting with tepid water and clean white paper towel.

Blue sample after peroxide clean
On the Cornflower Blue I tried i) baking powder (didn’t work), ii) salt (worked a bit) and finally iii) some hydrogen peroxide bleach. And it worked! I put about half a teaspoon on the sample and let it soak for a few minutes, then blotted it as dry as I could with clean white paper towel and let it dry on the windowsill.

Note: I used no soap or detergent in this test, either of which would have required rinsing which means more work and more wear on the felt finish.

THE UPSHOT

  • Felt is naturally stain resistant (although not stain proof)
  • Quickly blotting with a clean white paper towel or rag takes care of most accidents
  • For settled stains, gently infuse the spot with tepid water and firmly blot with a clean white rag or paper towel. As the stain is absorbed into the paper towel, keep moving to a clean part of the towel so you’re not re-transferring the tea into the felt. When clean, blot dry (press firmly) with clean dry material. This generally does the trick.
  • For the pale cosy colours I’ve had success with short (2 minute) spot-infusions of peroxide bleach (never use regular bleach) followed by gently blotting with tepid water, and finally blotting dry.
Head-swelling mention on Remodelista

Head-swelling mention on Remodelista

Have you ever been to the Remodelista site?  Everytime I visit I see something I like and the women who run it have “favorite things” listed that I either have or lust after so naturally I think they have exquisite taste.  All to say that when they published something on this flock of tea cosies, well,  (blush) I just thought that was the cat’s pajamas, as my grandmother used to say.

Here’s the link … “Tabletop: Felt Teapot Warmers from a Flock of Tea Cosy

 

 

French press coffee cozy

French press coffee cozy

French press coffee cozy design

You may have seen this coming but, here’s the french press coffee cozy version of our “Baseball” design.  Steeper shoulder curves, same buzzy zig-zag stitching on the dart, simple clean curved profile which looks completely at home on morning breakfast counters and evening dinner tables.

Modern french press coffee cozy in Moss Green wool felt

Designed with modern simple lines to fit Bodum’s “Chambord” french press coffee makers in the 8cup and 12cup sizes.

Seen here in fresh Moss Green which brings a breath of spring to any table.  Made from thick (3mm) European 100% wool felt to their highest standards.   This is some of the best, dense, wool felt made in the world.  And beautiful to boot.

And it’s a natural fabric — baa-baa sheep wool — which is a renewable resource and thus a wonderfully “green” choice for your tableware.  An eco-friendly choice as well as a beautiful choice.

A perfect fit for the home of any modern coffee lover.

French press coffee cozy in Moss Green

Shop

 

 

 

Reasons to love felt…

Reasons to love felt…

It was love at first sight for me, because of its density and thickness and its vibrant colours, but a number of the reasons to love this beautiful, non-woven wool fabric are invisible.

tom_roberts_-_shearing_the_rams_-_google_art_project

  1.  It’s a renewable resource. Sheep continually grow their wonderful woolly coats which are sheared each spring.
  2.  It’s naturally fire resistant and is self extinguishing.  If you hold a match to genuine, 100% wool felt it will start to burn — but if you take the lit match away the fire on the felt will smoulder and go out on its own.
  3.   It has high thermal insulating properties and this is what makes wool felt brilliant for a tea cosy.  (It is also extremely sound absorbing but that probably doesn’t matter for tea cosies.)
  4.   It’s naturally water repellent — spilt tea, for instance, will first bead on the surface of wool felt giving one the opportunity to quickly blot it up.
  5.   However it can absorb liquid four times its weight which make me think it would make a good door mat — if it wasn’t so pricey ;)  It also means wool felt makes great shoe inserts — insulating and absorbing the sweat or dampness.  Unlike anything polyester (plastic).
  6.   The European 100% wool felt that FoTC uses is the best in the world. Unlike made-in-you-know-where felt which, in my experience, can be easily shredded, this European felt is manufactured to the very highest quality and they’ve been making it for over a century.
  7.   It’s manufactured in an eco friendly manner. The thick, colourful European felt is made to Oeko-Tex 100 standards which mean its manufacturing creates no toxic waste. Children could chew on it and live to tell — although not recommended!
  8.   Frankly it just feels great.  It has a wonderful soft yet sturdy hand-feel which is an important quality for items we touch on a daily basis.

Felt cleaning A

Some interesting things that are (or were before being replaced by a plastic fabric) made of 100% wool felt are:

  • shoe inserts
  • piano hammers, bass drum strikers and timpani mallets
  • chalk board erasers
  • music cassette tapes — a tiny cube held the tape to the sound head
  • roofing felt
  • shoulder pads
  • Valenki — a type of traditional Russian footwear which are warm and dry and with good traction for walking on dry snow when the weather is frosty.
  • In the automotive industry it has been used to dampen the vibrations between interior panels and also to stop dirt entering into some ball/cup joints
  • for framing paintings — laid between the slip mount and picture as a protective measure to avoid damage from rubbing to the edge of the painting.
  • in millinary — many hats including fedoras
  • horse saddle felt
  • house and sound insulation batting — still being done

chalkboard_duster  borsalino_fedora

timpani_sticks

When I was in England a few years ago I came across a fascinating book on the felt industry there.  The industry, like so many, is now pretty much gone.  While some of the reasons the industry disappeared may be considered short-sighted it is certainly true that most industry has a finite life-span before something new — sometimes something wonderful — comes along and replaces it, changing the labour demographics and economies of towns and even nations.  Plus ça change…n’est-ce que pas?

the-felt-industry-book-cover

But wool felt has experienced a recent resurgence in the design and DIY fields.  Beautiful furniture and household wares — including tea cosies, french press coffee cosies, mug warmers (!) — as well as fashion items are available and can be found through quick, easy internet searches.  (Try duckduckgo.com for non-tracked searches.)  For a great collection of contemporary wool felt pieces by designers and artists (ahem, including flockofteacosy.com) you might be interested in this Sydney Morning Herald piece from a few years ago.

Modern tea cozy in Burnt Orange wool felt Modern Mug Cosy Purple  Neu Coffee Cozy in Industrial Fel

Flock of Tea Cosy’s shop.

Hot that pot, then on with the tea cosy…

Hot that pot, then on with the tea cosy…

Almost every tea culture does it — warms the teapot (or teacup) with the boiling water before making the tea in it.  Why?  Because the room-temperature vessel will steal almost ten degrees Celsius from the hot water.  This means if you don’t pre-warm your teapot, your lovely tea loses that heat immediately.  One of this flock of tea cosies will do an excellent job of keeping your pot of tea hot, but it can only maintain the heat that’s there.

As you can see, within about 20 seconds this room-temperature ceramic creamer stole over 10 degrees celcius heat from the boiling water just like a teapot does.

So warm that teapot first, then slip your tea cozy over it (say, isn’t that a smart modern tea cozy right there) — and you’ll have piping hot tea for ages.